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Full text of "Poland Russia and Great Britain 1941-1945"

be set free in accordance with the Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme
Council of the U.S.S.R. of August 12, 1941;, have been set free,, and certain
specified categories of those released have received material help from the
Soviet Authorities (free passes for railway and waterway travel,, subsistence
allowances during their journeys, etc.). All Polish citizens released and
not called up by the Polish Army are given an opportunity to work on
conditions identical to those enjoyed by Soviet citizens and this without
any special obligation whatsoever on the part of the Government of the
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.
All Polish officers on the territory of the U.S.S.R. have also been set free.
Your supposition, Mr. Prime Minister, that a large number of Polish
officers are dispersed throughout the Northern regions of the U.S.S.R. is
obviously based on inaccurate information.
EXCERPT FROM THE NOTE OF JANUARY 5, 1942, FROM THE
PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS,
CONCERNING THE SOVIET TERRITORIAL CLAIMS.
. . . The assertion of the Embassy that the law concerning citizenship
of the U.S.S.R. of August 19, 1938, could not be applied to the territories
of Western Ukraine and Western White Ruthenia in the period between
the middle of September 1939 and the middle of July 1941,, as this would
be incompatible with the provisions of the IVth Hague Convention of 1907,
is incorrect. The provisions of the IVth Hague Convention of 1907,
which the Embassy evidently has in view, refer to the regime of occupation
on enemy territory, whereas the assertion of " occupation " in respect to
Western Ukraine and Western White Ruthenia is, in this case., devoid of
all foundation, alike from the political as from the international point of
view, because the entrance of the Soviet forces into Western Ukraine and
Western White Ruthenia in the autumn of 1939 was not an occupation
but an attachment of the districts mentioned to the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics as the result of the freely expressed will of the population of
those districts.
EXCERPT FROM THE NOTE OF JANUARY 28, 1942, FROM
Mr. RACZYNSKI, POLISH MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, TO
AMBASSADOR BOGOMOLOV, CONCERNING THE FAILURE
TO SET FREE A NUMBER OF POLISH CITIZENS, AND
SPECIFICALLY A NUMBER OF POLISH OFFICERS.
The Polish Government regrets to have to bring to Your Excellency's
notice that, according to information just received, the liberation of Polish
citizens detained on the territory of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
in labour camps and other places of detention has not been completely
carried out. In a number of cases the local administrative authorities of
the Union do not apply in full the provisions of the Soviet Decree dated
August 12, 1941.
In this respect I have the honour to mention in particular the painful fact
that, of all the officers and soldiers registered in the prisoner of war camps
of Kozielsk, Starobielsk and Ostashkov, 12 generals, 94 colonels, 263 majors
and about 7,800 officers of lesser rank have so far not yet been set free.
It must be emphasized that investigations carried out in Poland and in the
Reich have made it possible to establish definitely that these soldiers are
not at present in occupied Poland, nor in prisoner-of-war camps in Germany.
According to fragmentary information that has reached us, a certain
number of these prisoners find themselves in extremely hard circumstances
on Franz Joseph Land, Nova Zemla and on the territory of the Yakut
Republic on the banks of the Kolyma river.
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